About your Search

20121222
20121230
STATION
CSPAN 8
CSPAN2 7
CNBC 6
CNNW 6
FBC 5
KRCB (PBS) 5
KQED (PBS) 4
KPIX (CBS) 3
KQEH (PBS) 2
MSNBCW 2
KBCW (CW) 1
KCSM (PBS) 1
KGO (ABC) 1
KTVU (FOX) 1
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 64
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 64 (some duplicates have been removed)
, the left in the united states has plenty of problems with science when it comes to issues they don't support. it's about an hour and a half. >> my name is kenneth agreement and a resident scholar here at the enterprise institute and i work on primarily energy and environmental policy issues. i'm a scientist as well as alex and my doctoral degree is environmental science and engineering. so i am really excited to have this event today on science called "science left behind," alex's great book, and before we start, if i seem a little fuzzy you've seen the commercial that goes something like this when you pay too much for cable you through things and if you throw things people think you have anger issues some people think you have anger issues in your schedule up and you grow a scraggly beard and you start taking in stray animals and you can't stop taking in stray animals don't pay much for cable. i have my own version today to the appeal to the kafeel you have a checkup and when he gives you a check that you have a flu shot at a tetanus booster. when you have the booster do we get th
brother is upset about financial disclosure that if there is money to be made it by science. but we want to kill each other and my colleagues will run over their grandmother for the advancement. [laughter] >> absolutely. there is not very many rich scientist. you have your place in fame but it is the discovery. john: why don't people know about anarchy? >> it to tries to make itself look good. looking at the atomic bomb, experiments on prisoners of four it is in the name of science. the scientist for trusted they made sure they did not do anything to scare the public fish show thmselves as trustworthy. we will not blow up the world. john: even know about -- albert einstein. >> i thought he proved the theory of relativity. >> he was brilliant. >> = mcs glared? >> not qui einstein. he owned it and tried to prove it eight times and he even wrote that in the footnotes. let's go on anyway. his colleagues in new this. he covered every other thing in science but he left out the equals mc squared out. that shows you how he felt. >> i don't think we john: do you cheat? ever? never? you lied to be
. the government-affiliated chinese academy of social sciences released its assessment of the international situation in a report on monday. referring to the budget in japan, they reported china-japan is in the worst state. it adds that tensions could be eased through diplomatic channels. china has repeatedly sent ships into japanese waters around the senkaku, apparently to jeopardize japan and to recognize that opposition exists. china says japan's stubborn position could push it further. china-japan relations, as well as northeast asia's security instability will face difficult challenges. analysts said the report is thought to be aimed at thwarting further moves of the president to be inaugerated this week. >>> park began picking her team of aides and advisers. lawmaker yohuhu is her chief of staff. the 67-year-old yu is an ally of pug. he is known as an expert in economic policy. >> clie chinese leaders are wary of the incoming government. >>> park began picking her team of aides and advisers. lawmaker yohuhu is her chief of staff. the 67-year-old yu is an ally of park. he is known as a
anderson, the creator of thunderbirds has died. >> 3, 2, 1. >> science fiction series first aired in 1965 with a use of the country. that followed the avengers of the international rescue using spacecraft and a range of vehicles. he suffered from alzheimer's disease since 2010. he died in his sleep at age 83. two bear cubs have been given a second chance after they were rescued by forest rangers. >> their mother was apparently killed, which means they were killed, which means they were all
. she has 51 of honorary degrees. she has been the first of everything -- the national science foundation. she was the very first black woman to get a ph.d. at and i.t.. [applause] she is an expert in medicare and medicaid and all things health. she has been called the health czar of america. the point guard over hauling the system. how about that for a job? what a powerhouse right here. so we actually have a lot of brainpower up here. all of you could have done very different things. you had a lot of choices. i would love to hear about how you ended up taking what you did. who wants to start? >> a failed of violinist. i was raised to be a musician. my mother still asks may what happened. i was always interested in politics and writing stories for the paper. it actually was complete serendipity. i was in college and was at a meeting of the naacp. we had some big issues. this was the 1960's and we heard music down the hall. it was the college radio station and i was drawn to it. i pitched in and begin programming classical music. and they needed somebody to help with the news. i
cuts should be extended and for whom. taxation is not an economic science. it definitely -- if you gather 10 people in a room, you're going to get 10 different opinions and the views on taxing -- on the merits and philosophy of taxing individual asks the rich will vary. but, you know, this sort of immediate problem is not necessarily the larger philosophical question. it really is the more practical question of what is our tax system going to look like. host: and we've got this lead editorial from this morning's "wall street journal." real housewife offense the beltway. they write -- host: back to the phones. don in oklahoma city on our line for democrats. go ahead, don. caller: good morning. i have a couple of quick comments i would like to make. the first is that i find it ironic for so many years in recent history republicans have claimed to own patriotism yet they don't seem to want to vacate their fair share. host: joseph rosenberg. guest: you know, i mean, i'm not sure, you know, i'm not sure this is about pay. -- patriotism or anything like that. you know, the question of wh
and time she was putting into her appearance. >> i want to move to science. it is such a huge thing these days about the lack of women in science. in some universities, only 10% of the teachers are female. what can we do to get more women motivated to go into science and why is it important? >> >> talk about why they are not there first. it begins very early in terms of which women are exposed to, the expectations. it is a lot of hard work. science is a funny business because one is not always in the limelight. that is kind of public affirmation that is not there until one is a fair distance down the road and becomes an instant entrepreneur or something like that. a lot of what happens to women will happen within the community within which they work. a lot of the attitudes get reinforced. i think what needs to happen is we have to try to reach young women early. we have to affirm them. as a society, we have to value science and those who do it more. everything we like to play with, including broadcast media and health care, they are rooted in scientific discovery and technological i
each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. it's just common sense. and you wouldn't have it any other way.e. but your erectile dysfunction - you know, that could be a question of blood flow. cialis tadalafil for daily use helps you be ready anytime the moment's right. you can be more confident in your ability to be ready. and the same cialis is the only daily ed tablet approved to treat ed and symptoms of bph, like needing to go frequently or urgently. tell your doctor about all your medical conditions and medications, and ask if your heart is healthy enough for sexual activity. do not take cialis if you take nitrates for chest pain, as this may cause an unsafe drop in blood pressure. do not drink alcohol in excess with cialis. side effects may include headache, upset stomach, delayed backache or muscle ache. to avoid long-term injury, seek immediate medical help for an erection lasting more than four hours. if you have any sudden decrease or loss in hearing or vision, or if you have any allergic reactions such as rash, hives, swelling of the
with a computer science degree. >> i graduated with my bachelor's in 2009 and my first job was actually at a retail store at the mall. at first it was kind of embarrassing. >> i couldn't get a job in the field i wanted to. so i figured i would go to law school to change to be where i want to be. >> reporter: even with a higher degree it is still tough. he is still in college and worried about his future because his friends have been forced to take jobs they don't even want. >> they settle with retail businesses. even all my friends work at mcdonald's and places like that because of the higher jobs that are hard to get these days. >> reporter: with the low- paying jobs, it will be that much harder. with tuitions rising across the nation, those bills are stacking up. >> one of my friends bar tend and work at the restaurant just to pay off the loan that she got. >> reporter: she has a 4-year- old as she is worried about what kind of a world her daughter will face. >> it is really disstressing. i got out of the school in the early 90s. it's a tough market. >> reporter: with all these colleg
and being ready, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. real people with our new 15 under $15 menu. oh my goodness... oh my gosh, this looks amazing... [ male announcer ] 15 entrees under $15. it's our new maine stays! like chicken with wine sauce or bacon wrapped shrimp. try 15 under $15 and sea food differently. aww man. [ male announcer ] returns are easy with free pickup from the u.s. postal service. we'll even drop off boxes if you need them. visit usps.com pay, print, and have it picked up for free. any time of year. ♪ nice sweater. thank you. ♪ a delicious new way to get essential vitamins you need. just bite into the tasty shell... to a chewy vitamin core for a unique multivitamin sensation! new centrum flavor burst. >>> "nightline" continues from new york city with terry moran. >> in the age of google and siri, chances are you can't remember your boss's phone number. or maybe the capital of anywhere. but there are some people who make it their business to remember absolutely everything without the help of technolog
science degree. >> i graduated with my bachelors in 2009 and my first job was at a retail store. at first it was kind of embarrassing. >> i couldn't get a job in the field i wanted to. i figured i have to go to law school to get where i wanted to be. >> reporter: even with a higher degree it is still tough. bill song is still. >> college and he's worried about his future because his friends have been forced to take jobs they don't even want. >> all my friends have a hard time. all of my friends with high degrees working at mcdonalds or some places like that, the higher jobs are harder to get nowadays. >> reporter: with a low paying job it's harder for the college grads to pay back student loans. those bills are stacking up. >> one my friends bar tends and works at a restaurant just trying to pay off the lobes she got. >> reporter: maria has a 4-year- old and she's worried about what kind of world her daughter will face. >> it's really distressing. i got out of school in the early 90s. it was a tough market then, but not the way it is now. >> reporter: with all these college graduates in r
's. he and his wife sylvia began program making in the 1950's. it was when he combined science- fiction with puppetry that he achieved his most famous creations. the pilot was commissioned for 321 our programs. -- 32 one hour programs. >> he said it was not day television series. and then he walked all the way up to me and said, this is a feature film. >> stingray was the first-ever british children's series to be filmed in color. >> anything can happen in the next half hour. >> capt. scarlet featured more realistic puppets and darker situations. this was the last of his series to be made with his puppet the technique. >> 20 kilometers away. >> one character remains closest to his heart. >> my favorite character was parker. >> he will be remembered as a man who entertained adults and children, using mechanical puppets, which still produce stories filled with emotion and excitement. >> matt zimmerman was the voice of allen tracy, the blond one. he played him, he did the voice. we spoke to him earlier and he told me more about his relationship with jerry anderson. >> he was an amazing man
.s. government is calling in the national academy of sciences for yet another safety review of airport scanners. the department of homeland security says the nonprofit group of scientists will be charged with reviewing previous studies done on the scanners. the call comes amid continuing concerns from some members of congress, as well as some scientists, about the amount of radiation that the scanners subject travelers to. brave investors who bought junk-rated greek bonds in january of 2012 are sitting on profits. the highly-risky bond buy during an extremely volatile time for the country has earned investors 20 times more than people who purchased top-rated german debt this year. bloomberg news reports the return on the greek junk bonds is up 80%, compared to a gain of just 3.7% for german bonds. it helped that greece's credit rating was upgraded to b- in june from "selective default" when the greek soveriegn debt was restructed. making those new year's resolutions to live healthier affects your waistline and your wallet. bankrate.com has listed some of those popular resolutions and crunched
happen at a nuclear plant. but experts say there isn't enough solid science in a draft outline, so they say they will need more time to finish their plans. >>> the nra decided to base the new guidelines on actual radiation readings. after the fukushima accident, authorities failed to get residents to evacuate promptly even though they had information from a radiation forecast system. the nra secretary is proposing the immediate evacuation of residents within 5 to 30 kilometers of a radiation plant when they reach 500 millisieverts per hour. they call for evacuation within a week's time if the level is at 20 millisieverts or more. but the panel of experts did not reach a consensus. some said the authority had simply decided on a level half that of international standard without enough scientific basis. others said the nra should adopt the international standard for the time being and continue discussions to set japan's own standards. >>> the operator of the crippled fukushima daiichi nuclear plant is asking for more public money. they say the compensation payments are higher than th
of choice meaning they kind of look like they are science science-fiction and that is deliberate. they are sort of modeled after science-fiction in order to appeal to the network engineers that are deciding where to put their network connections and where to connect to other networks. so when you walk and it's a bit like walking into a machine. their buildings inside are incredibly loud but incredibly cold from all the air-conditioners to keep the equipment cool. hugh also have a heated ceiling to obscure cables and there usually cages around, big steel cages maybe half the size of the hotel room and each belongs to network and that is where they keep their equipment securely and then run a wire to the top of the cage and drop it down into the cage of another network and interconnected that way. that is the physical internet connection and the internet world. >> host: when you look at the infrastructure of the wires of the internet, what did our those wires made of and what are they carrying? >> guest: predominantly the centers of the internet, the most important places, they are
this evening's collaboration of our national news and science programs. yesterday, she sat down with education secretary arne duncan for the special. it was the former chicago public school superintendent's first interview since the killings. here's part of their conversation. >> secretary duncan where does the responsibility lie for action here? >> it lies on all of us. all of us as parents, as community leaders, as religious leaders, as political leaders. no one gets to pass on this. and this is to the a time to point fingers or lay blame. often these things, there are lots of inclinations to do that but this is complex and anyone who wants to say there is a simple answer here i think does a great disservice to the complexity and urgency of fundamentally trying to make our country a safer place for our children. >> ifill: the president has asked the committee that you will be on, that vice president biden is going to spearhead to come up with solution or approaches within a month, before the state of the union speech. do you worry that the outrage is going to fade before that happens? >> i d
. you say that this is unsound science and potentially could lead to problems. why do you believe that there is not a value in at least looking at this gunman's dna? >> well, first of all, let me say that my heart goes out to all the people in newtown, connecticut. this was an horrific series of events. second of all, the major problem that i have as a geneticist is that it's impossible to gain much information with the sample size of one. so what you are looking at is one person's dna, and you're trying to say that it's different than other people. but you only have a sample size of one. >> would it be helpful, do you think, to look at the dna of other shooters of those from previous mass shootings? >> well, again, the problem is, we have probably less than five or even ten people that we're talking about. when studies -- accurate genetic studies are done on a whole population, we look for hundreds of different people, and you have to show a strong correlation with that. and the second problem would be what are we trying to look for? i mean, we're going -- the whole idea is you'r
the epa. inhof of the science committee issued a report back in october where he said the obama administration not just the epa but several agencies are working to find way to regulate the hydraulic fracturing at the federal level to stop the practice altogether. irony is fracking is one thing in the environmental -- excuse me, manufacturing sector that lifted up the economy. to the point it's not talked about exporting liquid natural gas. >> hypocrisy of the idealogue on the left. in the past coal was a big offender. they wanted to kill coal, which the epa has done. natural gas is wond evidenceful because it emit that was carbon. now coal is abolished we don't have new plans and now they are going after the natural gas. supposed to be benign. if you say it's a pendulum, it's not. ratchet. it expands. republicans can shrink it in the future you be in the end, it's inforrable and it grows. >> thank you. stay tuned for president's >>
what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. >>> an update from south africa tonight on nelson mandela. the 94-year-old former president was released from a hospital after almost three weeks of being treated for a lung infection and surgery to remove gallstones. mandela was moved to his home in johannesburg where he will continue his recovery. >>> china opened the world's longest high-speed rail line today. the train travels more than 1,400 miles from beijing in the north to the south of china, a trip that until now took 20 hours. the new train traveling at 186 miles per hour cuts the time to just eight hours. hundreds of the new trains will be put into service on this line alone, as china moves toward its goal of building a nationwide high-speed rail network. >>> and back in this country, a lost and found story involving a best friend. it all began christmas eve outside a grocery store here in new york where a security camera shows a man stealing a dog and then walking away. that dog's name is marlee. a woman who saw him trying to sell the d
and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. ♪ dennis: -- >> looked worse earlier, the past hour or so, the dow just in the green, bank of america doing some heavy lifting today. it's the one dow stock hitting new highs. good afternoon, everybody, i'm ashley webster, the last hour ever trading, and the count down to the closing bell begins right now. as i said earlier on, appears the bulls had too much eggnog and christmas cheer thanks to the continued uncertainty of washington, no real progress on a debt deal. the house speaker stuck in a blizzard in ohio, but you know what? the dow managed to raise earlier, just up a hint now, just a touch. meanwhile, the nasdaq, the s&p500, and the russell, as you can see, down slightly on the day after christmas. retail stocks are casting a follow on the market, the s&p500, the high end end names, all in the red. we got coach, high end retailers such as tiffany moving lower, ralph lauren, urban jut fitters lower on poor data on sales this holiday season, and it's
. >> there's science to it. >> there's heavy science and we tell you all about it in the book. >> we know what happens when we eat junk food. we get father, but what happens inside the body? >> a lot of things happen. we eat too much we gain fat and it's toxic. it surrounds our vital organs causes a toxic disease. it's killing us. >> there's two things here what you eat and what you do with your body. what's going on, chris, with our body and what does it take to cement that habit? >> one of the nice things about the book nice guys don't talk about exercise a lot. we talk about it all the time. it's the flywheel of maintenance. it does all kinds of stuff to help you lose weight be healthier, more optimistic or more energetic. we told people it makes a world of sense to work out semi hard six days a week. people go, what? way too scarey. but you have to do it. >> weight's become a bad buzzsquoorks . >> wheat's become a bad buzz world. >> 1% of the americans have celiac disease and they can't have wheat in their diet. i think it's easy for us to say, hey, we can't eat whe
him, nd he'll set money aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >> announcer: 'tis the season of more-- more shopping, more dining out... and along with it, more identity theft. by the time this holiday season is over, an estimated 1.2 million identities may be stolen. every time you pull out your wallet, shop online or hit the road, you give thieves a chance to ruin your holiday. by the time you're done watching this, as many as 40 more identities may be stolen. you can't be on the lookout 24/7, but lifelock can. they're relentless about protecting your identity every minute of every day. when someone tries to take over your bank accounts, drain the equity in your home, or even tries to buy a car in your name, lifelock is on guard. and with lifelock's 24/7 alerts, they contact you by text, phone or email as soon as they detect suspicious activity in their network. lifelock wants you to be protected this holiday season, so they're giving you 60 days of protection risk-free. >> my years as a prosecutor taugh
or gay rights or whatever. even in the medical sciences, there is discrimination. so it turns out that more women die of heart disease now than all cancers combined. more women die of heart disease rather than men. more women than men die of heart disease. did you know that? i was so shocked by some of these statistics. >> i saw why you were so strong about it. >> in 50 years of research has been done on men. i'll tell you a story, you'll realize how powerful females are. even in the research, a woman doctor discovered how to grow a heart from stem cells in a petrie dish. how did she do it? she did it with only female stem cells, because literally, the male stem cells got lost, loik in life. and they refuse to ask for directions. now, this is true. can you imagine that? i just believe breast cancer has done a magnificent job raising millions and millions of dollars to help that disease. but let's say 39,000 women died of breast cancer in the last couple years one year. 455,000 died of heart disease. and we haven't learned yet those organizational skills in order to raise awareness
straightforward guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. ashley: so what is the bright spot for next year? oppenheimer says it's domino's pizza, anywhere you slice it. the stock moving higher today. right now up just about 1 1/3%, up 56 cents at 43.37. oppenheimer says look the pizza maker in a good position for 2013, thanks to its same-store sales, innovation and international business, oppenheimer also raising its price target on domino's 6 bucks from 44 to 50. it's right now at 43.39. domi domino's up almost 30% for the year. it's been an amazing day. down 148 points at one point. dave asman, shibani joshi turn up and we're up 10 points. take it away. david: it is not the number. it's the turn around. about 150 point turn around. shibani: just to show you how volatile the markets are and how sensitive they are to comments coming out of washington and any advancement on the fiscal debt talks, the talk that congress is coming back to work on sunday, that turned everything around. david: let's go to
universities and allow more education in science and mathematics in the school system which would allow more people to do research in this field. to allow more electric energy instead of so much depending on petroleum and oil. guest: about the education system. the second question is about the role of private enterprise in these technologies. education is the silver bullet and the thing that we can do most cheaply and easily to get kids excited about solving big problems. it needs to begin not in universities but at elementary and high school level education. every year we choose 35 young innovators who we believe have the greatest capacity to change the world. this year most of the 35 lived and worked in the united states, less than five had gone to elementary school in the united states. they came from china, europe, israel. we are not doing a good job in the states in making science and technology a profitable activity, where kids can commit their entire lives and careers to it. the best thing we can do is to invest in science and technology and mathematics education in our elementary and
his nose so bright? well, science has an answer. it's red all right. we will share it with you ahead. ♪ rudolph the red nosed reindeer. you'll go down in history. ♪ with the spark cash card from capital one, sven gets great rewards for his small business! how does this thing work? oh, i like it! [ garth ] sven's small business earns 2% cash back on every purche, everday! woo-hoo!!! so that's ten security gators, right? put them on my spark card! why settle for less? testing hot tar... great sinesses deserve great rewards! [ male announcer ] the spark business card from capital one. choose unlimited rewards with 2% cash back or double miles on every purchase, every day! what's in your wallet? here's your invoice. i have a cold, and i took nyquil, but i'm still "stubbed" up. [ male announcer ] truth is, nyquil doesn't unstuff your nose. what? [ male announcer ] it doesn't have a decongestant. no way. [ male announcer ] sorry. alka-seltzer plus fights your worst cold symptoms plus has a fast acting decongestant to relieve your stuffy nose. [ sighs ] thanks! [ male announcer ] you're
to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> okay. two and a half minutes left. we've talked a lot about the resilience of the markets even in the face of the fiscal cliff market. maybe the market has been taking this in stride. look what happened today. we almost got to 20, the yellow flag area. we haven't been to 20 on the vix since back in july, early july, and today we're up 3.7% at 1928. however, look at a one--year chart of the dow comparing it to the vix. what often happens is when the vix peaks as it did in june and july, that can mark a bottom in the stock market so we're starting to move up again. i'm just saying. not trying to forecast anything and here's what happened today at the dow, sort of falling off here in the latter part of the hour but not off. off the lows of the day. down 21 points. material stocks were the strength today. up 1.5%. everybody else was either unchanged or lower. what do you make of the increased volatility or increased fear here, david darst, as we go into the end of the year
science-fiction boot camp and teachers comment into a week. i did weeks work out which i was told when everyone cries and has service break downs, indeed they do, which was great. at one point, one of my guys took me aside and said how can you tell which of us is going to make it? and i said no. he said that some of us are brilliant and some of us aren't. and can't you tell? is that the ones who make it will be the ones who write and write and write in some of the ones who are brilliant they have written brilliant stories and never write again. but the ones who get in there and write every day and finish stories ebony finish stories and write the next time, they will make it. and i saw him about four months ago in arlington as he was nominated for a nebula award. he didn't get the award, but still very proud of him. my wife and i have both the audio book versions. as such each voice actor. did you have those choices in mind is your writing the book? i suppose it did, but i also had to cheat because i had to steal some of the ones i like from the tv series. the ones i did like i substit
. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financialor literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations.ra and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation forr public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org captioning sponsored by wpbt >> this is n.b.r. >> mike: from paint to pet food, hats to barbecue. as a nation, we make millions of products every year. but have you ever wondered just how those things are made and what drives those companies? tonight in this "n.b.r." special edition "made in america" we go to towns small and large to meet unique businesses building jobs and profits. that and more tonight on "n.b.r." good evening, i'm mike hegedus with an n.b.r. special edition, made in america. walking down kentucky street in downtown petaluma, california, but it could be anywhere, u.s.a. this is where sm
railway. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org >> this is "bbc world news america." funding of this is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation and union bank. >> at union bank our relationship managers work hard to know your business. offering specialized solutions and capital to help you meet your growth objectives. we offer expertise and tailored solutions for small businesses and major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news america." >> egypt's new constitution is approved by more than 60% of voters who took part in the referendum. queen elizabeth h
this collaboration of all our national news and science programs. check your local listings. i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. we'll see you online and, as it's looking like the end is not upon us yet, again here monday evening. have a nice winter weekend. thanks for joining us. good night. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to le a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org
. this summer, he showed us the science behind every shape, size, and shade of these pixels. >> you now have your camouflage. so we're trying to trick the brainseeing things that aren't actually there. >> reporter: digital shapes creates depth and shadows where none exist. that's today's design. >> what's coming up down the road and very quickly is the harry potter cloak. >> what is that? >> reporter: with that fictional cloak, harry isn't just camouflaged, he's invisible. >> my body's gone! >> how invisible are we talking here? if i walked into a room with a soldier wearing one of these cloaks -- >> you wouldn't see him at all. he would be completely invisible to you. >> reporter: this isn't make-believe. the military has seen this so-called quantum stealth technology. it works by bending the light around an object, even concealing most of a person's shadow. imagine what that could do for a sniper, hiding in a field, or the american pilots who ejected over libya when their fighter jets crashed last year. >> they could actually pull out, very similar to what they carry with a survival blanke
isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> good morning, him ecarol costello. it's 30 minutes past the hour. time to check our top stories. we're 30 seconds away from the start of trading at the new york stock exchange. representatives from the new york national guard are ringing the opening bell today. [ bell ringing ] more than 4,000 guards and airmen helped the victims of superstorm sandy. investors are still concerned about the looming fiscal cliff. >>> blizzard warning in up to six states. in arkansas the national guard has been called to provide ambulance service for residents. heavy snow and strong winds will lead to whiteout conditions across the ohio river valley. the heaviest snow is expected to move into western pennsylvania and new york state this afternoon. >>> hundreds of american families wanting to adopt russian children may have their dreams dashed. they have given final approval for a ban on such adoptions, seen as payback for a recently signed u.s. law imposing travel and financial restrictions on human rights abusers in russia. >>>
to understand there is no established science right now to determine whether or not a gene will predispose someone to violent behavior. i mean that's the first thing. this is a very complicated situation. people have genes. they don't always predispose or actually turn into a specific problem. and in this case if someone were to be found to have a gene, and this is a needle in a haystack, it might give some clues as to whether or not someone might or, other people might be predisposed to this kind of crime. heather: this would be a first of a kind study or a first of a kind research to >> again, there have been studies that have been done on violent offenders, and previously and we have gotten some body of evidence that helped us to determine whether this is a problem. where it is more established, where we're doing genetic testing where it is incredibly value in determining predisposing conditions such as taysak's disease or whether someone ends up with sickle cell anemia. whether someone is predisposed to alzheimer's or cancer it gets controversial and this particular probably the most c
for the work force. there's such an emphasis on science, technology, engineering and math. i would never give short. >> lift to -- shrift to that, but i would be remiss if i did not say that we need an a in that -- [applause] because without art, there won't be any innovation. [applause] there won't be any innovation. so what we need is theme, and when it comes to our economy as well, i'm a very aggressive advocate and a believer in the creative economy. and i know our mayor shares a commitment to that in everything from public art to arts education to arts in education. you know, when i travel, people do talk about that school across the river, harvard, but the next school they'll ask me about is berkeley. you know, we boast so many incredible institutions related to the creative economy, and so i can't be here amongst the tribe and not talk about the humanities and arts. .. >> mining is sam. [applause] >> i'm glad that you touched on education. my question is obviously the headquarters are here in boston but also in other cities in america and two others overseas. our school system for fail
what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. >>> i'll tell you, it might be the middle of winter, but it's more like the cast of "some like it hot" here at the exchange. it's in french. i'll let you say the actual name of this group. a group of ballet enthusiasts founded in 1974, professional male dancers. everything from ballet to modern dance, classical, original works. it's definitely adding an air of levity to the occasion. in a couple seconds, the opening bell at the nyse. as we said, at the big board, the ballet from monte carlo. performing until january 6th in new york city. and over at the nasdaq, a group that does a lot of good work at this time of the year, the salvation army. >> some like it hot. >> interesting. >> the birth cage. bird cage. >> looking where we are opening, no surprise to the down side here. initially out of the gate, one of their biggest losers is microsoft, down by more than a percent. we were talking about whether or not there will be any upside to pc sales. a lot of the data points indicated by "the new york times"
to cooperate with china on many other fronts. we have many other engagements in terms of science and technology, clean energy, collaboration's by our center for disease control, trying to look at the various world health problems, the solutions to which benefit united states as well. we will always have disagreements. we have disagreements with canada on trade issues. we have disagreements with france and mexico and many other countries. there is a mechanism by which we can all go to neutral refereeing of those issues. the wto is one way that we can do that. [inaudible] >> i did not have a chance to read that article. am not familiar with everything that was mentioned in that article. two months before the election, there was this big tough-on- china -- >> the pivot was announced almost a year before that. what set of the discussion of the exhibit was the announcement -- pivot was the announcement of rotating 2000 marines throughout australia. i do not think china should be fearful of 2000 marines hit in australia. -- in australia. our engagement with other countries throughout the asia- pacifi
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 64 (some duplicates have been removed)